• An elegy is an expression of grief. In a personal elegy the poet laments the death of some close friend or relative, and in impersonal elegy in which the poet grieves over human destiny or over some aspect of contemporary life and literature. In this way we get his philosophy of life and death.


  • Definition of Elegy An elegy generally combines three stages of loss: first there is grief, then praise of the dead one, and finally consolation. The word elegy comes from the Greek word elegeia, which means “lament.”

    One may also ask, what is the purpose of an elegy? An elegy is a sad poem, usually written to praise and express sorrow for someone who is dead. Although a speech at a funeral is a eulogy, you might later compose an elegy to someone you have loved and lost to the grave. The purpose of this kind of poem is to express feelings rather than tell a story.

    Regarding this, what is an elegy in literature?

    Elegy is a form of literature that can be defined as a poem or song in the form of elegiac couplets, written in honor of someone deceased. It typically laments or mourns the death of the individual. Elegy is derived from the Greek work elegus, which means a song of bereavement sung along with a flute.

    What is an example of elegy?

    Examples of famed elegies include: Bitter constraint, and sad occasion dear,/Compels me to disturb your season due:/For Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime,/Young Lycidas, and hath not left his peer.

DiscussPlaces is a place to make new friends and share your passions and interests. Quench your thirst for knowledge, discuss places with other aficionados, and swap recommendations. Are you an aspiring foodie who dreams of living in New York? Or perhaps you are looking for the best chicken wings in Cincinnati? Then this is the place for you! Any one can join in with a passion or interest – whether it be talking about their favorite restaurant in Barcelona or raving about their latest trip to Italy. Join us!



This page shows discussions around "What is personal elegy?"


Where is it?